Different countries, different customs: International Packaging Trends (When in Rome, do as the Romans do)

>>pack’s!<< Swiss Packaging Newsletter, Packaging trends Although some marketing managers won’t believe it, 74 percent of buying decisions for consumer goods are made at the point of sale (POS), and up to 60 percent are made on the basis of product packaging and presentation. In an era when media budgets for mass media consistently miss […]

>>pack’s!<< Swiss Packaging Newsletter, Packaging trends

Although some marketing managers won’t believe it, 74 percent of buying decisions for consumer goods are made at the point of sale (POS), and up to 60 percent are made on the basis of product packaging and presentation.

In an era when media budgets for mass media consistently miss the mark with increasingly differentiated target groups, and ambitious Internet campaigns serve only as a highlight in annual reports, the visual and touchable appearance of a product is the manifestation of a brand more than ever. It is only the packaging of a product that has the direct, immediate connection with the consumer.

Crosscultural awareness

While general packaging trends remain relatively apparent and are respected my many branding experts, expansion into different cultures often creates serious problems. The design agency, kakoii, with offices in Berlin and Tokyo, has many international clients and knows how to navigate the changing cultural landscape of international markets. In order to reach consumers there, it is of the utmost importance that international brand managers adapt their packaging to the specifics of local markets. Ā«This requires sensitivity toward crosscultural awareness on the part of corporations and agenciesĀ», according to Thekla Heineke, Creative Director of kakoii.

Ā«Packaging that is successful with customers in Germany may already be interpreted differently in France. In Russia or Japan, it may not work at all. Even in an increasingly global society, it is important to differentiate between the various cultural traditions that define markets.Ā»

There are the classic pitfalls of design psychology. For example, the fact that the color white, which in central Europe is used to communicate purity and cleanliness, is the color of death in some Asian countries. However, the complex cultural and social intricacies that need to be observed in order for a brand to be truly successful are even more sophisticated, per Heineke.

From Central Europe . . .

After years of packaging and communication overload in terms of advertising, a clear trend toward simplicity and elegance has crystallized in Central Europe. The Loha-target groups (“Lifestyle of Health and Sustainability”) have leveled the playing field here. Ā«Consumers are looking for reduced complexity. What sells product is simple, distinct packaging that radiates authenticity and significance Ā», observes Heineke, referring to Apple packaging and numerous new organic brands. This is the strategy kakoii is currently pursuing for the brand development of a new French premium mineral water that will compete in a hot, contested market. In this market, bottles are often created by star designers, and the cost of a half-liter bottle generally does not exceed 15.00 Euro.

… over Russia…

The Russian market, on the other hand, is characterized by a consistently growing upper echelon of higher-wage earners who are particularly focused on expensive, foreign brands. Coffee packaging designed by kakoii for the Russian market incorporates the preferences of well-to-do, luxury-oriented, male Russians: the brand was clearly positioned as an imported luxury label, and using local focus groups, the brand was refined until the perfect blend of opulence and machismo was attained.

…to Japan

Design development for the Japanese market continues to reign as the supreme discipline of packaging. In the country traditionally known for packaging design, there are highly differentiated packaging strategies. While lower-priced items are packaged in a Manga-style that Europeans deem adventurous at best, there is a clear correlation between price and simplicity of packaging: the higher the price of a product, the greater the reduction in design. The cosmetic brand, Shiseido is the perfect example of this trend. It was at Shiseido where Thekla Heineke learned her craft in packaging design in Japan, and where she developed numerous cosmetic lines for kakoii Tokyo.

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Bathing with Dresdner Essenz

For the cosmetics brand, “Dresdner Essenz”, the Berlin creativity agency secures the advertising budget of Li-iL GmbH. The family-operated enterprise, “Dresdner Essenz”, a manufacturer of over-the-counter medications and baths, is particularly known for its cosmetics products. A rigorous agency screening preceded the award of the comprehensive consulting contract, and kakoii won over three other competitors […]

For the cosmetics brand, “Dresdner Essenz”, the Berlin creativity agency secures the advertising budget of Li-iL GmbH. The family-operated enterprise, “Dresdner Essenz”, a manufacturer of over-the-counter medications and baths, is particularly known for its cosmetics products.

A rigorous agency screening preceded the award of the comprehensive consulting contract, and kakoii won over three other competitors to receive the job.

In the first phase, the agency will re-work the packaging design of the entire brand and its traditional cosmetics products. Putting the various product lines: “Wellness”, “NatĆ¼rlich Gesund” (naturally healthy), and the children’s line “Dreckspatz” (little rascal) under one strong umbrella brand will notably strengthen future branding. This measure is coupled with classic advertising.

On the part of the agency, the relaunch is spearheaded by creative director, Thekla Heineke, who began her career as packaging designer at Shiseido in Japan. She is responsible for all of the packaging design services offered by kakoii from Berlin and another agency location in Japan.

The results of our cooperation will be tangible in the fall/winter 2013.

www.dresdner-essenz.com

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Luxury cosmetics in a tetra-pack

Moving boxes, cans, milk jugs, medication bottles – more and more, designers are putting their scents and cosmetics into ordinary packaging. A review. DiePresse.com, 27.09.2007 (ThePress.com, 9/27/2007) (…) Visions of the tetra-pak were floating in designer Thekla Heineke’s head as she developed the packaging for a hair coloring product by Shiseido. The new feature of […]

Moving boxes, cans, milk jugs, medication bottles – more and more, designers are putting their scents and cosmetics into ordinary packaging. A review.

DiePresse.com, 27.09.2007 (ThePress.com, 9/27/2007)

(…) Visions of the tetra-pak were floating in designer Thekla Heineke’s head as she developed the packaging for a hair coloring product by Shiseido. The new feature of “Tasting Tone” is its quick and uncomplicated use, and this is precisely what Heineke wanted to highlight. “The familiar shape of a tetra-pak represents the simple, daily use of a product”, says the designer, along the lines of: open, use, and toss. She explains that the strategy to use cheap, or at least ordinary, packaging for luxury cosmetics represents a quest for understatement. Thekla Heineke designs for the Berlin-based agency, kakoii, which is also responsible for the design of the cosmetics line “FSP” by Shiseido. FSP’s foil closures, which do not instill a sense of exclusivity and seem familiar since we are used to seeing them on medications, also play on the aesthetics of the ordinary. Heineke describes the attraction of products designed in this manner as: “It is not high-end, but insiders know nonetheless that it is expensive.”

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kakoii at the German Packaging Summit

Packaging Summit: The most important event of the year for interested packaging designers takes place October 18 – 19: the 3rd German Packaging Summit. This year, kakoii is participating. Under the heading: Keep it political, please kakoii Creative Director, Thekla Heineke, will presentĀ Non-linear Strategies in Brand Management through: Customized evolving brand design. In other words: […]

kakoii presentation at the German Packaging SummitPackaging Summit: The most important event of the year for interested packaging designers takes place October 18 – 19: the 3rd German Packaging Summit. This year, kakoii is participating.

Under the heading: Keep it political, please kakoii Creative Director, Thekla Heineke, will presentĀ Non-linear Strategies in Brand Management through: Customized evolving brand design. In other words: How to hit the bull’s eye even though there is no longer a center.

Here you will find more information on our expertise in packaging design.

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What is the epitome of luxury packaging for you?

Creativ verpacken (Creative Packaging) – Luxury packaging, October – Designer’s Opinion Thekla Heineke, Creative Director at kakoii Berlin: “What do you expect from packaging that promises us luxury? A direct relationship with the product, an idea or concept that has been encapsulated without simply using popular stereotypes. Keeping the promise to be there just for […]

Creativ verpacken (Creative Packaging) – Luxury packaging, October – Designer’s Opinion

Thekla Heineke, Creative Director at kakoii Berlin: “What do you expect from packaging that promises us luxury? A direct relationship with the product, an idea or concept that has been encapsulated without simply using popular stereotypes. Keeping the promise to be there just for me. For example, let’s take a look at the Ipsa fragrance line by Shiseido: a small, round flacon produced in a limited series. What is the appropriate packaging for a scent that is fresh, dry, and light? This scent is embedded in a round form, wrapped in a white leather bag that can be opened by zipper. The front is covered by a double-layer of sheer gauze which holds a feather of the same blue color as the flacon. Is it possible to create packaging that is more personal or sensual to the touch?”

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